News

It’s About Time

That I posted something, yes.  The blog has been pretty dormant for a year or so now, but I’m going to try to pick things up again now and get the word out about what’s news in the American West when it comes to climate change.  And by the way, if you don’t already, follow me on Twitter @ClimateWest.

So what’s inspired this renewed commitment to the ClimateWest blog?  It was the news yesterday that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency finally proposed to issue a long-overdue air pollution permit for the Bonanza coal-fired power plant in northeastern Utah.

This is big news.  The 500-megawatt Bonanza power plant, with its 600-foot tall smokestack, has for years avoided complying with basic clean air standards.  Located in the high desert of the Uinta Basin in northeastern Utah, the plant’s owner, Deseret Power Cooperative, upgraded the plant to burn more coal in the early 2000’s.  More coal meant more pollution and under the Clean Air Act, that meant new emission controls were required to be installed.

Unfortunately, Deseret refused to install legally required pollution controls.  Even more unfortunate, at the time, the EPA condoned this.

WildEarth Guardians detailed these violations in a notice of intent to file suit against Deseret under the Clean Air Act in 2012.

The permit proposed yesterday will finally set things straight.  As EPA acknowledges, it made a mistake:

In carrying out our Title V permitting obligations, EPA has preliminarily determined that the PSD permit EPA issued in 2001 omitted certain PSD permitting requirements and that EPA failed to analyze and apply the PSD regulations correctly when issuing that permit. Among the requirements omitted was a Best Available Control Technology (BACT) analysis for NOx.

PSD refers to “Prevention of Significant Deterioration.”  It’s a key requirement of the Clean Air Act that says if you’re a big source of air pollution and you modify your facility and you increase your pollution, you’ve got to install best available pollution controls.  What EPA’s proposal means is that, finally, Deseret will finally install legally required clean air controls.

So how overdue is this action?  Technically, EPA was required to issue this permit in the early 1990’s, more than 20 years ago.  It was only after WildEarth Guardians sued the agency to compel them to meet their legal deadline that we have the proposal today.

It’s great news for clean air in the region.  While other coal-fired power plants in the west have had to make significant clean air upgrades, Bonanza has been given a free pass to pollute.  At long last, that’s slated to change.

And with clean air comes opportunity.  Facing the prospect of having to spend millions to upgrade the Bonanza plan, one has to honestly question whether Deseret is better off shuttering the plant and investing in cleaner, more affordable energy.

In the meantime, the proposed permit is out for public comment and the EPA has proposed a hearing in Fort Duchesne, Utah on June 3.  Stay tuned for more from WildEarth Guardians.

Bonanza Power Plant

 

UPDATE:  Unfortunately, EPA changed course when issuing the final permit for the Bonanza plant, eliminating any requirement that Deseret comply with the Clean Air Act.  Instead, EPA embarked upon a separate process to issue a “corrected” PSD permit, with no deadline for final action and no promise of real accountability.  On January 7, 2015, WildEarth Guardians appealed the EPA’s latest permitting decision to the Environmental Appeals Board.