More Fracking in Store for Colorado’s Front Range

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management announced last week its intent to auction off 86 parcels comprising more than 36,000 acres of our public lands to the oil and gas industry for drilling and fracking.  These lands are located along Colorado’s Front Range, including in Weld, Adams, Arapahoe, Morgan, and Logan Counties. They also include portions of the Pawnee National Grassland, which is already being heavily impacted by oil and gas development.

Click here or on the image below to view our interactive map of these where these fracking leases are located in relation to Front Range communities and other key areas.

Front Range Oil and Gas Leases

Map of oil and gas lease parcels proposed for auction by the Bureau of Land Management in May 2015.

The ensuing drilling and fracking will fuel air pollution in the Denver metro area, an area already violating federal limits for ground-level ozone, the key ingredient of smog.  The key culprit for the region’s smog?  Unrestrained oil and gas development.  And, despite rules adopted to limit oil and gas industry emissions, studies have found smog-forming pollution is still on the rise.

The development also stands to destroy drinking water and diminish the flows of the South Platte River.  As WildEarth Guardians pointed out in a recent objection to the Forest Service’s plans to allow oil and gas leasing under the Pawnee National Grassland, oil and gas drilling and fracking is poised to permanently destroy 1.4 million acre-feet of water, nearly half a trillion gallons (see objection at p. 19).

But the real kicker is the amount of greenhouse gases that would be unleashed.

Although the Bureau of Land Management has not been entirely transparent yet on the full amount of carbon pollution expected to be released, an estimate by the Forest Service found that development of leases on the Pawnee national Grassland would unlock 127,440 tons of carbon dioxide and 6,608 tons of methane.  Given that methane is 86 times more potent than carbon dioxide, this amounts to nearly 650,000 tons of carbon in total slated to be released annually because of expanded fracking just on the Pawnee.

And this doesn’t even take into account the carbon pollution that would be released from natural gas processing, oil transport and refining, and of course the eventual combustion of all the oil and gas slated to be produced from these leases.

WildEarth Guardians is fighting to stop this tide of fossil fuel destruction and keep the Front Range safe and healthy.  We’ve turned the heat up on both the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management, exposing how disastrous their oil and gas plans would be.  Sadly, they’re not yet listening.  With the Bureau of Land Management’s latest notice, we have a chance to appeal and, hopefully set things straight.  Stay tuned for updates.

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Oil drilling and fracking viewed from near the Pawnee Buttes on the Pawnee National Grassland. If the Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management have their way, more of this will be showing up along Colorado’s Front Range.

Interior Department Killing Climate Progress

The climate hypocrisy of the U.S. Department of the Interior reached new and absolutely bizarre lows this past week.

On Monday, Sally Jewell, Secretary of the Interior Department, helped unveil the largest solar farm on our public lands, commending the project for taking “action on climate change” and helping “move our nation toward a renewable energy future.”

The plaudits were well founded.  After all, an estimated 300,000 tons of carbon stand to be displaced annually by the 550 megawatt solar farm, not an insignificant amount.

Two days later, however, Sally Jewell completely obliterated this climate progress.

In an oil and gas lease sale in Colorado, the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management auctioned off 15,424 acres of public lands for drilling and fracking in the Little Snake Field Office in northwest Colorado.

Touted as an economic success, what the Bureau of Land Management failed to acknowledge is that development of these leases would fuel an increase in carbon dioxide (i.e., CO2) emissions to more than 800,000 tons annually just in the Little Snake Field Office.  The chart below, taken from the agency’s own environmental analysis, plainly shows the projected increase.

CO2 increase in Little Snake Field Office

Air emission increases projected in the Bureau of Land Management’s Little Snake Field Office of western Colorado (taken from p. 23 of the agency’s analysis).

That’s not the worst of it.  The chart above also shows that methane emissions (i.e., CH4) from oil and gas development would increase to 19,247 tons annually.  Given that methane is 86 times more potent than carbon dioxide, that amounts to more than 1.6 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent.

When everything is said and done, we’re looking at a decision by the Interior Department that will increase carbon emissions by more than 2 million tons annually.

carbon differences

The net carbon increase is actually 2,184,229 tons annually.  No climate benefits will be remotely reaped by the Interior Department’s solar project. 

And as if this wasn’t bad enough, this increase doesn’t even take into account the carbon emissions that will result from the burning of the produced oil and gas.  All told, we’re taking about a major carbon setback.

So much for the benefits of solar, so much for climate progress at the Interior Department, and so much for moving our nation toward renewable energy.

Oh, and as for the claimed economic success of the Bureau of Land Management’s oil and gas lease sale?  Taking into account the value of carbon, which could be as high as $220 per ton, we’re looking upwards of $480 million in costs.  That’s a far cry from the $319,113 in revenue reported by the agency.

The worst of it is, more oil and gas leasing and even more carbon pollution is on the horizon.

Just this past week, the Bureau of Land Management announced plans to lease 35,000 more acres of public lands in Colorado, including 25,000 acres of the Pawnee National Grassland.  And next week, the agency intends to auction off 12,000 acres of public lands for fracking in southern Utah.

The climate hypocrisy of the Interior Department seemingly knows no bounds.  For our nation and our future, hopefully this will change and change soon.  We can’t save the climate by selling more oil and gas.

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Public lands oil and gas development approved by the Department of the Interior is destroying climate progress.

Taking Aim at Utah’s Coal Polluters

Last week, WildEarth Guardians joined the Sierra Club and the National Parks Conservation Association in calling on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to finally clean up the Bonanza coal-fired power plant in northeastern Utah.  This latest volley comes on the heels of ongoing efforts to hold the power plant’s owner, Deseret Power Co-op, accountable after years of violating the Clean Air Act.

The Bonanza power plant is one of the last remaining coal-fired power plants in the American West to be retrofitted with up-to-date pollution controls.  Located in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah, a region struggling with smog and other pollution, the plant is hammering local communities with foul emissions.  It’s also choking iconic landscapes with its haze, including nearby Dinosaur National Monument.  Not surprisingly, even the National Park Service has called out the Environmental Protection Agency for not doing more to clean up the plant.

Our message to the Environmental Protection Agency has been simple:  if the power plant can’t operate in compliance with our clean air laws, it shouldn’t be allowed to operate.  We’ll see if the agency follows through or if the Bonanza power plant will get another free pass to pollute.

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The Bonanza coal-fired power plant sports a 600-foot smokestack that rises ominously above the Uinta Basin. It’s the fourth largest source of carbon pollution in the state of Utah and every year fills the skies with tens of thousands of tons of toxic chemicals.

Take a Fracking Tour in the Rockies!

Check out our new interactive photo tour map of fracking in the Rocky Mountain West!

Click on the image below and see firsthand what fracking is looking like on the ground, what’s it’s doing to the iconic American West, and what’s at stake if we can’t overcome this onslaught from the oil and gas industry.  If you really want to dive in, download the .kml file, open it up in Google Earth, and explore away (and by the way, for the more GIS minded, Google Earth Pro–which comes with way more data handling capabilities–is now free).

The vast majority of oil and gas development occurring in the Rocky Mountain West is happening on public lands.  Although our public lands are an immense national treasure, they are sadly being industrialized.  Worse, this development is fueling unprecedented releases of greenhouse gases, including from methane leaks.  WildEarth Guardians is working to keep our public lands frack-free in order to safeguard the climate and protect our future.

This is a work in progress, we’ll keep posting photos as we get ‘em and refining the map as we go.  In the meantime, enjoy!

fracking tour map

BLM Farmington Holds Pipeline Public Meeting But Refuses to Let the Public Speak

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BLM Farmington Holds Pipeline Public Meeting But Refuses to Let the Public Speak

January 13, 2015

Mike Eisenfeld, New Mexico Energy Coordinator, San Juan Citizens Alliance, (505) 360-8994 mike@sanjuancitizens.org

Tim Ream, WildEarth Guardians’ Climate and Energy Campaign Director, (541) 531-8541, tream@wildearthguardians.org

Farmington, NM—Braving dangerous road conditions and inclement weather, approximately 80 members of the public turned out Tuesday night for Farmington’s sole public meeting on the proposed Piñon Pipeline, only to be told that the public would not be allowed to speak. In a January 1st Bureau of Land Management news release announcing the meeting, BLM stated, “The BLM considers opportunities for public involvement to be critical to the success of the planning process.” When people, many Navajo and some travelling nearly 200 miles to attend the meeting, tried to voice their concerns, however, they were informed by BLM that they were not allowed. In addition, BLM gave no formal spoken presentation on the project, relying solely on poster board stations with limited information on the project.

“BLM Farmington has been an underperforming, rogue office for many years,” said Mike Eisenfeld, New Mexico Energy Coordinator for the San Juan Citizens Alliance. “But this is a new low. Inviting the public because their involvement is critical and then ignoring what they have to say is outrageous, especially when these folk made such an effort to participate. I guess this is democracy BLM-style going through the motions

“If it wasn’t clear before,” Tim Ream, Climate and Energy Campaign Director for WildEarth Guardians said, “it should be now. The only people BLM Farmington listens to are the oilmen getting rich off our public lands. This is an embarrassment that should be felt all the way back in Washington.”

The proposed 140-mile pipeline would cut a swath through Navajo communities and the greater Chaco Canyon cultural heritage area. Thus far, BLM has refused to commit to studying pipeline impacts through a comprehensive environmental review and admits it does not have a legal plan for horizontal drilling development in the Mancos Shale, the very drilling that is driving this project. Additional public meetings are scheduled for Lybrook on Wednesday and Santa Fe on Thursday. The public attending will expect to be heard at those meetings.

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Fossil Fuels from Public Lands Costing us Dearly

Last year, WildEarth Guardians called out the U.S. Department of Interior for touting the economic benefits of its fossil fuel management program while completely ignoring the carbon costs.

The omission was significant.  As we estimated, the cost of oil, gas, and coal produced from public lands managed by the Interior Department in 2013 could be in the billions and likely overshadows the economic “benefits” reported.  These costs reflect the economic damages caused by carbon-induced climate changes, in other words, the costs that society absorbs in the form of extreme weather, rising sea level, higher air pollution, etc.

Since the release of our report, however, we’ve come to find out that we seriously missed the mark in our cost estimate.  In fact, the latest studies indicate we underestimated total costs by more than 100%.

As a report published yesterday in the journal, Nature Climate Change, reports, carbon costs are not actually the $101 per ton we relied on in our report, but actually $220 per ton.

The study, completed by Stanford scientists, is a telling revelation that the cost of carbon is getting more expensive than ever as our understanding of climate-related economic damages is refined.  The findings should sound an even shriller alarm over the need to significantly curtail greenhouse gases as quickly as possible.  As a press release from Stanford bluntly points out:

Based on the findings, countries may want to increase their efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions, said study co-author Delavane Diaz, a PhD candidate in the Department of Management Science and Engineering at Stanford’s School of Engineering. “If the social cost of carbon is higher, many more mitigation measures will pass a cost-benefit analysis,” Diaz said. “Because carbon emissions are so harmful to society, even costly means of reducing emissions would be worthwhile.”

In our July 2014 report, we estimated the total cost of oil, gas, and coal produced from public lands overseen by the Interior Department in 2013 to amount to more than $176 billion.  Based on the latest $220 per ton estimate from Stanford, however, total costs are actually higher than $383 billion.  With the Department of Interior reporting $121 billion in economic benefits, this amounts to a total cost of $262 billion.

In other words, in 2013, the overall cost of oil, gas, and coal produced from public lands was more than double the reported benefits.

On the flip side, this means that every ton of coal, every barrel of oil, and every cubic feet of natural gas kept in the ground is money in the bank.  With carbon costs rising, it means that fossil fuels on our public lands are becoming more valuable in the ground than out.

Unfortunately, with the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management claiming that increased oil production was a “major accomplishment” in 2014, the value of keeping fossil fuels in the ground may not be sinking in yet.

For the future, both near and long-term, hopefully that will change.  With carbon costs continuing to rise, the Interior Department can’t afford to keep turning a blind eye to our climate.

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A worthless coal mine surrounded by valuable, undeveloped coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. Photo by EcoFlight (ecoflight.org).

 

U.S. Interior Department: Still All About Fossil Fuels

Even as scientists are confirming that it’s time to keep fossil fuels in the ground, the U.S. Department of the Interior continues to open the door for extensive coal, oil, and gas development on our public lands, fueling unchecked carbon pollution at belligerently reckless rates.

The latest step backward occurred earlier this week as Interior’s Bureau of Land Management just gave itself a big pat on the back for approving thousands of new drilling permits and offered to lease nearly 6 million acres of public lands to the oil and gas industry for fracking.

The Bureau was so zealous, they gloat that they offered drilling permits and leasing opportunities “in excess of industry demand.”  

Flaring on well in Lybrook badlands

Flaring, where the oil and gas industry purposefully burns off natural gas while producing oil, is the ultimate waste. Here, flaring at a fracking site on public lands in northwestern New Mexico was condoned by the Bureau of Land Management. Photo by Mike Eisenfeld.

In other words not only is the Bureau of Land Management meeting 100% of industry demands, they’re actually trying to give away even more.

It doesn’t end there.  Last month, Interior reaffirmed its belief that coal is an “important part of our domestic energy portfolio,” offering new guidance to make leasing and mining more “efficient” and “certain” for industry.

Certainly, the new guidance is meant to ensure the American public gets a fair return on coal, especially where it’s exported, and it is likely to spur higher prices for federal coal leases and higher royalties.  However, there’s an ominous omission.  Nowhere has Interior signaled its intent to ensure carbon costs are factored into the valuation of coal.

It’s a simple concept.  Carbon has a price.  If unleashed from the ground (in the form of oil, gas, or coal), that price becomes a cost borne by our economy in the form of the destruction wrought by climate change.  Those costs can add up, erasing any economic benefits otherwise reaped by the production and consumption of fossil fuels.

In the case of publicly owned coal, all signs indicate that carbon costs are, in fact, adding up and overriding any economic benefits.  As reported by our friends at Greenpeace, while a ton of federal coal is brining in $1.03 per ton in revenue, it’s yielding carbon costs of between $22 and $237.

Interior’s new guidance, while providing greater clarity and direction around the valuation of publicly owned coal, continues to turn a blind eye to carbon costs, filling industry’s coffers at our expense.

Ensuring a fair return from coal sales is certainly laudable, but the reality is, no return can ever be fair if it doesn’t fully compensate the American public for the climate damage caused by unleashing more carbon.

Now, more than ever, Interior should be exercising massive restraint when it comes to development of fossil fuels on our public lands.  Sadly, they’re not.  The list of new coal, oil, and gas projects slated for approval in the coming months continues to swell.  Here’s just a sampling of what’s in the queue:

And this is just a fraction of what’s planned for approval in the next year.  It’s like a tsunami of carbon threatening to be unleashed.

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55,000 acres of public lands are slated to be auctioned off for fracking in southern Utah. The prospect of more fossil fuel development portends disaster both for our climate and our public lands.

Of course, with Sally Jewell, the Secretary of the Department of Interior, actively advocating for more fracking (and even dismissing the notion that fracking should be banned or otherwise curtailed), perhaps there’s little chance of a shift.

If that’s the case, the Obama Administration needs to fire Sally Jewell.  After all, she’s the one who said climate denial has no place at the Department of the Interior.